Is Your Trademarkable Beer Name Distributable?

This beer label was rejected by TTB due to the imagery, as TTB deemed it to appeal to kids.
This beer label was rejected by TTB due to the imagery, as TTB deemed it to appeal to kids. (Speaking of kids, Happy Halloween!)

It’s no secret, I’m a big believer in proactive brand protection. To that, I’ve been pleased to see breweries get out in front of trademark issues by asking for early clearance reports for their new beer names, then filing a 1(b) trademark application to secure the name. It’s a big part of what I do at Reiser Legal.

However, I wanted to flag one issue for those working through some potential beer names with the beer attorneys. I’ve recently noticed a number of published trademarks that appear to tout the effects of drinking alcohol. There have been word marks and then also boundary-pushing design marks as well. Bear in mind that, even if a mark makes it past USPTO’s initial review, to get the mark to register, a brewery would eventually have to put that mark into use in interstate commerce. For most breweries, the way to prove that use is packaging and shipping across state lines. But, to package and ship across state lines, you’ll need a TTB-approved label (Certificate of Label Approval, or COLA for short)—even some states require a COLA before getting product into retail in state. Notably, TTB has strict labeling requirements and rejects labels that go too far in touting alcohol’s effects.

In other words, even if a brewery can obtain a federal Notice of Allowance for a beer name, federal (or even state) labeling laws might not allow the brewery to package and ship that beer anywhere but the brewhouse, jeopardizing the ability to actually get that trademark to register. Side note there, as beer-blogging-brethren have noted, TTB has been looser on animals who are appear under the influence than humans.

Keep in mind also that TTB has other bases to reject beer names / labels, and even if they don’t, a state authority may find a boundary-pushing mark or design objectionable. Designs or marks that would draw kids in, for example, are problematic at both levels—which might make some branding angles hard to build out, even if a brewery gets the trademark for the direction it wants its brand to go. Here at Reiser Legal, we love the DIY ethic that pervades the brewing industry. However, sometimes shooting a branding direction to a beer attorney is worth it, before doing too much building out and, worse, investing in a trademark direction that has uncertain label approval chances.

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