Introducing: Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board!

And just like that the Washington State Liquor Control Board has become the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board. Here’s Reiser Legal’s warm welcome to the agency we know and love, under a fresh new moniker. I suppose it’s only fair, given the rise of the cannabis industry—and in this the Evergreen State, at that. Maybe few have noticed and few will ultimately care. But, I like the new name! And, mostly, I’m just glad I can still affectionately think of them as the LCB (because LMB just wouldn’t have that same authoritative ring).

For those wondering when the change happened, it looks like the confetti fell on July 24, 2015, when a number of LCB-related bills went into effect after this last legislative session. Turns out, a section of the Cannabis Patient Protection Act (Senate Bill 5052) which we hadn’t been tracking was what made the change (which, LCB reports, is the first change to the name since the Liquor Control Board was established by the Steele Act back on January 23, 1934).

Here’s a header from their homepage taken just now:

Introducing, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board!
Introducing, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board!

And, here’s an old snap from April or so, thanks to the Wayback Machine:

 

Screen Shot 2015-07-29 at 3.38.27 PM

 

 

 

 

 

Nothing but hard-hitting news here on the Brewery Law Blog!

Read More

Can a Washington brewery make cider or mead? Can a Washington winery make beer?

Breweries make beer. Wineries make wine (or, under their license, other emerging products such as cider and mead). But what about the reverse? Can a Washington brewery produce wine, cider, and mead? Or, can a Washington winery produce beer? Can either start distilling? Yes, the entity can do so. But, as you might expect, it’s critical to obtain the proper alcohol licenses to produce beverages in the other produCan a Washington Brewery Make Cider or Mead?ct category. Indeed, at both the state (Liquor Control Board or “LCB”) and federal levels (Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau or “TTB”), different licenses are required to cross over into producing other kinds of alcoholic beverages. There are some facility setup issues to bear in mind when doing so, with separation concerns, but they’re not insurmountable. Indeed, as interest in all kinds of fermented beverages is on the rise, we expect to see more beverage businesses extending their brand into these new places.

Read More