Bigger and Better: The Reiser Legal Team Joins Miller Nash Graham & Dunn LLP

doug

We are ready to announce that our team of counsel will be joining forces with the firm of Miller Nash Graham & Dunn, LLP (MNG&D). Our alliance provides the clients of Reiser Legal with affordable access to the Northwest’s most fully-equipped beverage law practice. 

This combination of resources ensures that our clients don’t have to go out-of-house to seek additional legal services. This means that you will now have access to first-rate assistance in many additional areas, including securities regulation, employment relations, tax, real estate financing and leasing, import/export, and the full range of federal and state litigation.

As craft-oriented legal counsel, we have developed close relationships with each of our clients. The Reiser Legal team talked with many firms in an effort to find the best marriage of craft beverage ideals and high-quality legal services. We found those traits in Paul Havel, head of the craft beverage law division at MNG&D – and we can’t wait to introduce Paul and his team of experienced beverage attorneys. 

If you are interested in working with our team, please email us or call us at 503.205.2596. We hope you are as excited as we about this new alliance!

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Can I License a Brewery at Home?

Ever wondered if you could start a professional brewery in your shed or garage? Might be possible! Here are the issues typically at play for the would-be professional homebrewer.
Ever wondered if you could start a professional brewery in your shed or garage? Might be possible! Here are the issues typically at play for the would-be professional homebrewer.

Here’s part two of our homebrew series. See part one if you’re curious about the legality of homebrewing generally, and the common questions we see about homebrew-related activities. This part is for the dreamers out there who see an opportunity to potentially go pro, without excessive startup costs.

We are often asked, can I brew commercial beer at my house? Can I open a brewery in my garage? Will TTB license my outbuilding as a brewery? Is it possible to open a brewery on residential property?

The answer is a resounding…maybe! But that’s more promising than a no, right?

We totally get the desire to try to open a brewery at home. You avoid costly commercial leases. You can build out on a leisurely timeline. Wear rubber boots over your pajamas if you want. It seems like a tantalizing way to cost-effectively start producing beer, and then sell kegs into the local market. That way, you may be able to generate a bit of brand recognition and see how it goes, before committing to bigger expenses. (And, of course, having a professional homebrewery comes with bragging rights, doesn’t it?)

First, here’s a bit about the federal perspective on licensing a brewery on residential property. Then, keep reading, as we’ll dive into issues that may lurk on the state and local side of things.

TTB’s Approach to Home Professional Breweries: “Dwelling House”

From TTB’s chair, a brewery may not be established in any “dwelling house.” That’s in the code. So what in the heck does that mean? Keep in mind that TTB Brewer’s Notice applications are reviewed on a case-by-case basis. But what is worth noting is that TTB typically analyzes the residential issue in the following way.

A brewery typically may be located on residential property in the following circumstances (though TTB has final say):

-Ideally, if the building is detached from the residence. The proposed brewery premises would be in an outbuilding, for example. The outbuilding would need to be secure, with locking doors and windows. We have helped clients obtain approvals for these kinds of properties.

-What about an attached garage? Well, TTB may allow this, although it is subject to even deeper scrutiny. Here, there could not be access between the residence and the would-be brewery. So, for example, if there is a door into the residence, that would have to be walled off or blocked. If the garage connects to the residence through a breezeway of sorts, it is a closer call. As of the time of writing, we have not had anyone decide to give this a shot.

-Lease allowing the activity. Keep in mind also that TTB requires that applicants have the legal right to operate a brewery at the specified premises. If you personally own the property, but you have an entity (such as an LLC) that is going to operate the brewery, then the entity needs to have lease rights to this location. Moreover, if there is a lease in place, the same rule applies. TTB will need to make sure the entity has rights, via a lease, that allow the production of alcohol. If a landlord is not cool with this setup, then it’s not going to fly.

State and Local Issues with Home Professional Breweries

We’ve noted the general TTB concerns. However, it is worth mentioning that even if TTB would be okay with licensing a premises, state or local concerns may get in the way. Indeed, TTB is a federal agency. In issuing an approval, TTB is not going to make sure all of the state and local ducks are in a row. TTB makes its independent decision. There is the concern of state regulators, of course. However, there are also potential zoning and code issues to consider.

State Regulators: In Washington, for example, LCB often takes the same approach as TTB. Detached residential (outbuilding) tends to work. A garage is a closer call, but with the above-noted steps, plus TTB approval, it seems likely LCB would follow TTB’s lead.

Zoning Concerns for the Professional Homebrewer

Here may be the catch. When you operate a brewery, you are making a form of commercial use of your property. Zoning restrictions may or may not allow the operation of a brewery at the residence. It is an absolute must that the would-be professional homebrewer investigate the zoning of the property.

In general, the more rural the property, the more uses like these are possible. The less rural, the trickier it gets. If the zoning of the property is residential, it may nevertheless be possible to go through a “Home Occupation” process of sorts whereby you apply to operate a business at your home. If you meet certain conditions, the local zoning folks may issue you approval. Nevertheless, pay attention to the home occupation requirements, if applicable. It may be that if your neighbors take issue with the smell of the operation (even if you aren’t brewing at a bigger scale than you were homebrewing), they could put the kibosh on your home occupation. They may also receive notice of your plans and have the opportunity to object up front (so, it goes without saying, that you’ll want to have a good relationship with those around you). Beyond that, the zoning office itself may try to frame your business as too industrial, and not within the uses allowed for these kinds of businesses. It may take some explanation, some tap dancing, some selling.

Furthermore, if a pro brewery at home is allowed, then local zoning will dictate the things you can and cannot do in the operation of your brewery. You may only be able to receive deliveries during limited hours, or a certain limited number of days of the week. In some instances, you cannot have any employees, rather, only those living at the residence may operate the busines. You may not care to operate a taproom at the location, but local zoning would also speak to that. It’s likely that unless you are in a rural area, a taproom will be a no-go, and you would only be able to have a limited number of visitors for the purposes of the business. Parking is also an issue. If you are going to have visitors, you may have to provide off-street parking for them. So, if you were going to compliantly take advantage of a mobile-canning service for your wares, this parking issue could rear its head, depending on the configuration of the residential property.

Despite all these caveats, it is well worth exploring the option of licensing a home brewery. Before you sink money into a commercial lease, why not see if the space you have already could fit the bill, and give you a cost-effective way into the wild, rewarding ride of operating a professional brewery? If all goes well, you’ll outgrow the space quickly. Even so, it’ll be fun to one day reminisce about your startup’s humble roots.

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TTB Ruling 2015-1: Exempt Malt Beverage Formula Ingredients

Hooray! Brewers can eschew time-consuming Formula Approvals for more than fifty additional ingredients, thanks to TTB Ruling 2015-1!
Hooray! Brewers can eschew time-consuming Formula Approvals for more than fifty additional ingredients, thanks to TTB Ruling 2015-1!

Behold, more exempt beer ingredients (scroll down for the entire list)! TTB has just superseded and replaced the very important TTB 2014-4 ruling, in favor of TTB Ruling 2015-1. This new ruling adds more than fifty ingredients to TTB’s existing malt beverage ingredient exemption list.

Here’s a link to TTB Ruling 2015-1 “Ingredients and Processes Used in the Production of Beer Not Subject to Formula Requirements”

And here is a link to the attachment: “Exempt Ingredients Under the Conditions of TTB Ruling 2015-1″

For brewers that need COLA approvals, one huge drag on the process has the nettlesome Formula Approval requirement. To get to market, you need a Certificate of Label Approval (COLA). But, to get the COLA, depending on what’s in your recipe, you need a Formula first. And if you review the average processing times (here are COLAs and here are Formulas), that can mean being three months out from an approved label. And no one wants to print cans, just to find out the label needs to be changed to be compliant.

Today, thanks to urging from the always-awesome Brewers Association, as well as pleas from individual brewers, TTB has added more than fifty ingredients to its exemption list. In doing so, TTB has found that these ingredients are “traditional” and, like we all know, not likely to cause problems. Although 2014-4 was a welcome ruling, adding all sorts of fruit adjuncts and spices, there were notable gaps—such as coconut or chamomile. Here’s a link to the Ruling, and here’s the link to the Exempt Ingredients (which combines 2014-4 and 2015-1).

The important thing to know is that TTB’s position has not changed with respect to adding extracts, essential oils, or syrups. If you’re adding the real thing, you’re exempt. But if you’re adding extracts, those still could contain alcohol, so the Formula requirement remains in place. Whatever the case, it’s a big day for craft brewers, shaving off time and making it easier and faster to get to market.

We’ll include below the list of exempt ingredients from the attachment below, for easy reference (although, of course, you should consult with an attorney or review the ruling yourself to ensure you are compliant):

TTB RULING 2015-1 Exempt Ingredients:

AGAVE

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

ALLSPICE

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

ANISE

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

APPLES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

APRICOTS

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

BASIL

Includes bush basil and sweet basil, as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

BILBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

BLACKBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

BLUEBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

BLACK CURRANTS

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups. Also see RED CURRANTS

BLOOD ORANGES

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate, peel, or zest. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

BOYSENBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

BROWN SUGAR

When brewers use brown sugar in the fermentation of a malt beverage, the designation is not required to refer to the ingredient. Instead, the malt beverage may be labeled as a “beer” or “ale” and so forth.

CANDY (CANDI) SUGAR

When brewers use candy/candi sugar in the fermentation of a malt beverage, the designation is not required to refer to the ingredient. Instead, the malt beverage may be labeled as a “beer” or “ale” and so forth.

CAMOMILE (CHAMOMILE)

Includes English, Roman, German, and Hungarian, as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CAPSICUM

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

 

INGREDIENT

DESCRIPTION/LIMITATION

CARAWAY, BLACK CARAWAY (BLACK CUMIN)

Includes caraway, black caraway (black cumin), as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CARDAMOM (CARDAMON)

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CASSIA

Includes Chinese, Padang, Batavia, and Saigon cassias, as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CHERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CHICORY

Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CHOCOLATE

Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups. Brewers may make non- misleading references to the use of chocolate malt by designating a product as, for example, “chocolate stout,” even though it contains no added chocolate.

CINNAMON

Includes Ceylon, Chinese, and Saigon cinnamons, as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CLEMENTINE

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate, peel, or zest. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CLOVE

Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

COCOA

Includes cocoa powder or cocoa nibs. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

COCONUT

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

COFFEE

Coffee beans, coffee grounds, or coffee brewed with water. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CORIANDER

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CRANBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

CUMIN (CUMMIN), BLACK CUMIN (BLACK CARAWAY)

Includes cumin (cummin) and black cumin (black caraway), as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

DATES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

ELDER FLOWERS

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

FIGS

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

GINGER

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

GRAINS OF PARADISE

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

-2-

INGREDIENT

DESCRIPTION/LIMITATION

GRAPES

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate, or grape must. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups. REMINDER: As set forth in the ruling, any exemption from the formula requirement applies only when used in the production of a malt beverage as defined at 27 CFR 7.10.

GRAPEFRUIT

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate peel, or zest. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

HIBISCUS

Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

HONEY

Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

HUCKLEBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

JASMINE

Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

JUNIPER BERRIES

Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

KALE

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

KIWI

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

KUMQUAT

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

LACTOSE

When brewers use lactose in the production of a malt beverage, the designation is not required to refer to the ingredient. Instead, the malt beverage may be labeled as a “beer” or “ale” and so forth.

LEMONS

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate, peel, or zest. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

LEMON GRASS

Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

LIME

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate, peel, or zest. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

MACE

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

MANGO

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

MARIONBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

MAPLE SUGAR/SYRUP

When brewers use maple sugar/syrup in the fermentation of a malt beverage, the designation is not required to refer to the ingredient. Instead, the malt beverage may be labeled as a “beer” or “ale” and so forth.

MOLASSES/BLACKSTRAP MOLASSES

When brewers use molasses/blackstrap molasses in the fermentation of a malt beverage, the designation is not required to refer to the ingredient. Instead, the malt beverage may be labeled as a “beer” or “ale” and so forth.

NECTARINE

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

NUTMEG

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

-3-

INGREDIENT

DESCRIPTION/LIMITATION

ORANGES

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate, peel, or zest. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

ORANGE BLOSSOM/FLOWER

Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

OYSTERS/OYSTER SHELLS

Whole oysters, juice, or puree. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups. Oyster shells may be used when consistent with good commercial practice.

PASSIONFRUIT

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PEARS

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PEACHES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PEPPER, BLACK OR WHITE

Includes black pepper and white pepper, as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PEPPER, CAYENNE OR RED

Includes cayenne peppers and red peppers, as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PEPPERS

Includes hot, chili and bell peppers. Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PEPPERMINT

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PINEAPPLE

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PLUM

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

POMEGRANATE

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

PUMPKINS

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

RAISINS

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

RASPBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

RED CURRANTS

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups. Also see BLACK CURRANTS

ROSEMARY

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

SAFFRON

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Exempt when used only as a flavor and not exclusively as a coloring material. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

SAGE, GREEK SAGE

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

-4-

INGREDIENT

DESCRIPTION/LIMITATION

SODIUM CHLORIDE

When brewers use sodium chloride in the fermentation or flavoring of a malt beverage, the designation is not required to refer to the ingredient. Instead, the malt beverage may be labeled as a “beer” or “ale” and so forth.

SPEARMINT

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

STAR ANISE

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

STRAWBERRIES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

SWEET POTATOES

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

TANGERINE

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate, peel, or zest. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

TEA

Tea may be whole leaves or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups. REMINDER: as set forth in the ruling, the exemption from any formula requirement applies only when used in the production of a malt beverage as defined at 27 CFR 7.10, and would not apply to products (such as many kombucha products) fermented solely from tea and sugar, which are beer under the IRC, but is not a “malt beverage.”

THYME/WILD OR CREEPING THYME

Includes thyme and wild or creeping thyme, as outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. Spices may be whole or ground. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

VANILLA

As outlined in FDA’s GRAS listing at 21 CFR 182.10. REMINDER: As set forth in the ruling, the exemption of vanilla from the formula requirement applies only to the use of vanilla in the form of whole or crushed vanilla beans. Does not include vanilla powders, extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

WATERMELON

Whole, juice, puree, or concentrate. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

YUZU

Whole, juice, puree, concentrate, peel, or zest. Does not include extracts, essential oils, or syrups.

Processes Determined to be Traditional

Industry members may use woodchips, staves, or spirals derived from barrels that were previously used in the production or storage of distilled spirits or wine as part of the process of aging beer, as well as woodchips previously used in the aging of distilled spirits or wine, provided that this process does not add any discernible quantity of distilled spirits or wine to the beer.

  • Aging beer in plain barrels or with plain woodchips, spirals or staves made of any type of wood.
  • Aging beer in barrels, containing no discernible quantity of wine or distilled spirits, that were previously used in the production or storage of wine or distilled spirits.
  • Aging beer with woodchips, spirals or staves derived from barrels, containing no discernible quantity of wine or distilled spirits, that were previously used in the production or storage of wine or distilled spirits, or with woodchips, containing no discernible quantity of wine or distilled spirits, that were previously used in the aging of wine or distilled spirits.

—–

 

Again, here’s a link to TTB Ruling 2015-1 “Ingredients and Processes Used in the Production of Beer Not Subject to Formula Requirements”

And here is a link to the attachment: “Exempt Ingredients Under the Conditions of TTB Ruling 2015-1″

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Brewery Startup Series #8: Timeline to Opening

Going from vision to lights on and taps open can't be done overnight, but this brewery startup timeline gives you a good estimate of the timeline from idea to frothy fruition. (Pictured? That's Burial Beer Co., the vision of Doug Reiser of Reiser Legal, a craft brewery located over in Asheville, NC. Stop by and say hi to Doug sometime.)
Going from vision to lights on and taps open can’t be done overnight, but this brewery startup timeline gives you a good estimate of the timeline from idea to frothy fruition. (Pictured? That’s Burial Beer Co., the vision of Doug Reiser of Reiser Legal, a craft brewery located over in Asheville, NC. Stop by and say hi to Doug sometime.)

How long does it take to open a brewery? I’ve put together resources as a part of our Brewery Startup Series in the past. I thought it was time to revisit the milestones we’ve provided, putting the brewery startup process into a helpful timeline for those thinking about getting started. This is a sketch of what it looks like for most emerging alcoholic beverage businesses, getting at how long it takes to open a brewery:

8+ months out:
-Business Planning: Put together a business plan, consider whether investors are needed. If so, you may need to add to the timeline, to compliantly raise funds and bring those investors onboard.

7-8 months out:
-Business Setup: Form your entity, obtain an Employer Identification Number, Open a Business Bank Account, Fund the Account. This comes first.
-Get an Operating Agreement together that guides decision making, transfers of interests, and sets forth the business and management structure.
-Take steps to clear your brewery name.
-As soon as the entity comes together, file for protection for your selected and cleared brewery name. (Can do this up to 3 years or so before you open, but best to wait until the entity is in place.)

5-6 months out:
-Begin seeking out space, negotiate a lease.
-Once a lease is in place, kick off federal licensing as much as is possible.
-Order equipment.

1-2 months out:
-Tee up the state licensing process as much as possible so that when federal comes in, you’ll be ready to submit.
-Obtain federal approval and submit to state.
-Submit label approvals to TTB or the state, if required.
-Clear and protect all important brand material, such as the brewery logo and flagship beer names.

There are many sub-steps of course, and the scope of the project and commitments of the founders may affect the timeline a good bit, but those are the big milestones. If you have a good idea of your team, a handle on brewing, and a vision of what you want to do, this is a realistic look at how it works for many brewery startups. We’re here to help for those who have questions or are looking to fill in the gaps.

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TTB Permits Online Makeover + Mac Compatibility!

Well, wouldn’t you know it. Just after I found a working solution to using TTB Permits Online and my Mac and wrote about it here, TTB gives Permits Online an unexpected but very welcome update. In a post yesterday, September 2, 2015, TTB announced Permits Online 4.2. Here are the highlights:

1. Permits Online is truly Mac compatible. Finally! As a part of that, you can now upload documents with ease—and without installing Microsoft Silverlight. This is the biggest one for me.

Here are the browser versions it works with on Macs and PCs alike (it may not look perfect in browsers other than Explorer for a little while, but Permits Online is fully functional, they’re just working out cosmetic kinks):

  • Apple Safari 6.0 or higher
  • Google Chrome 42.0 or higher
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 8 or higher
  • Mozilla Firefox 39.0 or higher

2. TTB Permits Online 4.2 has also pulled the +4 zip code (four zip) requirement for addresses, so you only need to enter in the first five digits (the ones we all use anyway). This will save a bit of time and source of delay for new permittees.

3. There’s an Auto-fill button for addresses (but I’d suggest using it with caution—make sure the premises address is the one you want!).

All in all, I’m really glad to see this update take place. Nice improvements no matter what kind of machine you use, but all of us diehard Mac users have the most to be happy about!

TTB Introduces Permits Online 4.2 with...wait for it...Mac compatibility! I've been hoping something like this was in the works.
TTB Introduces Permits Online 4.2 with…wait for it…Mac compatibility! I’ve been hoping something like this was in the works.

 

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