Bigger and Better: The Reiser Legal Team Joins Miller Nash Graham & Dunn LLP

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We are ready to announce that our team of counsel will be joining forces with the firm of Miller Nash Graham & Dunn, LLP (MNG&D). Our alliance provides the clients of Reiser Legal with affordable access to the Northwest’s most fully-equipped beverage law practice. 

This combination of resources ensures that our clients don’t have to go out-of-house to seek additional legal services. This means that you will now have access to first-rate assistance in many additional areas, including securities regulation, employment relations, tax, real estate financing and leasing, import/export, and the full range of federal and state litigation.

As craft-oriented legal counsel, we have developed close relationships with each of our clients. The Reiser Legal team talked with many firms in an effort to find the best marriage of craft beverage ideals and high-quality legal services. We found those traits in Paul Havel, head of the craft beverage law division at MNG&D – and we can’t wait to introduce Paul and his team of experienced beverage attorneys. 

If you are interested in working with our team, please email us or call us at 503.205.2596. We hope you are as excited as we about this new alliance!

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Avoiding a Brewery Trademark Dispute: Here’s How.

You know what they say about an ounce of prevention. This latest trademark dispute highlights again why proactive trademark clearance practices are a must.
You know what they say about an ounce of prevention. This latest brewery trademark dispute highlights again why proactive trademark clearance practices are a must.

The latest brewery trademark dispute has the same notes, just a different rhythm. This time the matter involves Austin, Texas-based brewery Oasis and the much larger New Belgium. I spoke with Ronnie Crocker at the Houston Chronicle, who wrote this insightful article covering the latest dispute. As I noted to Ronnie in the article, and I note here quite frequently, these matters are largely preventable. Here’s how.

If there is any brand material you would be upset to change, conduct a full clearance search and file an intent-to-use trademark application before you adopt the mark. Don’t wait. Indeed, as this matter highlights, a mark you might think is clear can become fraught with problems in just a couple of weeks. Your filing date is the basis for your federal rights. Without a federal priority date, you might wind up locked out of using that brand name anywhere but your hometown. There’s no reason for that, especially if the brand in question is your brewery’s name or main logo.

Today, if you’re investing in a brand, especially if you’re getting packaged branded material to the shelves and have any aim to expand, file. Clear today, file today. File. The up-front investment is minimal compared to the costs to your brand and to your budget if you bump into issues with another beverage company. Put a little more into your start-up budget. Make proactive brand protection a part of your ongoing recipe-production and beer-release strategy.

I don’t know anyone who has regretted having the registration.

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